F-Bomb Tweet? Who Cares?

It was big news last week when a horrendous tweet was sent out by Chrysler that not only insulted their customers and community, but also dropped the F-bomb.

Chrysler Retweet: “I find it ironic that Detroit is known as the #motorcity and yet no one here knows how to f**king drive.”

This is highly damaging to their brand because it is offensive to so many people.  Of course part of what is offensive is the causal use of the F-bomb.  But really, who cares?  Well, a lot of people.  And this is where the Adult Industry and the rest of the world diverge in some ways.

If you are in the Adult Industry and you drop the F-bomb no one really gets upset, at least not in the same way that the vanilla world does.  People might question why you are being unnecessarily crass, but even that may be unlikely.

What is interesting, though, is that the F-bomb is still generally a Twitter no-no. Even in porn you don’t see people using it very much and when they do it is usually in direct reference to a sex act and not used as an exclamation or just for shock value.

Studies have been done to show that negative tweets are no good. They can cause you to lose followers or slow your network growth.  Despite what people say about drama drawing attention, Twitter has shown that Tweeps like to keep it positive.

This makes me wonder if the F-bomb, despite its myriad uses and meanings, is generally thought of as a negative word; maybe that is why even in Adult business it is used with restraint and avoided whenever possible.

Of course the F-bomb was not the only problem with the Chrysler tweet. The fact that it dissed their entire community and consumer base is the bigger issue.  Even porn stars would not be able to get away with genuinely insulting their audience.

The take-away? Don’t bite the hand that feeds you, and use the F-bomb sparingly, if at all.

Team