Sex and Facebook Ads

scantily clad girl in a christian singles ad on facebookIf you thought having an adult Facebook page was hard to accomplish, try running an adult ad. It is almost impossible. Even running content that is considered family friendly can be really hard to maintain due to the strict rules set forth by Facebook.

To run a successful ad campaign on Facebook you have to start with the content of your page. Your content has to be deemed acceptable, and Facebook has some pretty strict guidelines. Many of these seem pretty simple and straightforward. But the reality is, when you are on the network and doing your thing, it can be pretty hard to color within the lines.

Facebook Rules for Advertising:

General Rules:

  1. Ads must directly relate to the content on the landing page.
  2. Ads must clearly represent the company, product or brand that is being advertised. Products or services promoted in the ad must be directly available on the landing page.
  3. Ads cannot insult, harass or threaten a user.

Translation:

  1. You cannot have an ad that is advertising something different than the page it is linked to.
  2. You cannot pretend you are a different company or a different person than you actually are.
  3. You cannot tease or taunt people in your ad to get them to click on the ad.

Landing Pages:

  1. Ads that contain a URL or domain in the body must link to that same URL or domain.
  2. Landing pages cannot generate a pop-up (including “pop-overs” and “pop-unders”) when a user enters or leaves the page.

Translation:

  1. If you show a web address in your ad, the ad must link to that web address. So you cannot have a web address but have the link go somewhere else.
  2. When you click on the ad it cannot take you to a page that has pop-up ads or pop-up pages.

Targeting:

  1. Any targeting of ads based on a user attribute, such as age, gender, location or interest must be directly relevant to the offer, and cannot be done by a method inconsistent with privacy and data policies.
  2. Ads with adult themes, including contraception, sex education and health conditions must be targeted to individuals at least 18 years old. Platform ads should do this via Demographic Restrictions, not by obtaining user data.

Translation:

  1. When you target an ad to your audience, it has to be directly related to the content you are advertising. So if you are advertising a dating site, it has to be directed to singles.
  2. Any ad with adult content can only be directed to people 18 and older.

Prohibited Content:

  1. Adult content, including nudity, sexual terms and/or images of people in positions or activities that are excessively suggestive or sexual, or provocative images in violation of community standards;
  2. Adult friend finders or dating sites with a sexual emphasis;
  3. Adult toys, videos or other adult products;
  4. Ads must not be false, misleading, fraudulent, or deceptive.
  5. Ads will not be permitted in cases where a business model or practice is deemed unacceptable or contrary to Facebook’s overall advertising philosophy.

Translation:

  1. Porn. Naked pictures. Sexual pictures. Naughty words. Violence…in a nut shell. Nope, probably no nut-shells either.
  2. Dildos, vibrators, strap-ons, lube, and pretty much anything you would find in a sex shop.
  3. You cannot lie in your ad.
  4. You can’t go against the code of ethics in the Facebook Terms of Service.

Most people in the adult industry will find advertising on Facebook pretty difficult. Some of you will be able to do it, depending on what your website or content is, some might not. Learning the rules are the only way to know if you can.

Stay tuned for the next post on porn stars advertising on Facebook and learn some tips and trick on how to run a Facebook ad if you are in porn.

25 Ways to Know if You have a Sexy Blog

lipstick kiss marks on a computer mouse25 ways to know if you have a sexy blog

  1. You blog about sex
  2. Your images need censorship bars
  3. People read your blog in private
  4. Your blog becomes my Friday night date
  5. Girls get jealous when their boyfriends read your blog
  6. Everything is tagged #NSFW
  7. Someone got fired reading your blog
  8. Your blog spices up my marriage
  9. Your blog is the other woman
  10. I get tingly thinking about your blog
  11. I have to use four letter words to describe your blog
  12. I light candles to sit down and read your blog
  13. Me, my boyfriend and your blog make a three-way
  14. My new fetish is your blog
  15. When I want my girlfriend to talk dirty to me I have her read me your blog
  16. Even my computer gets hot when I read your blog
  17. I slip into something more comfortable before reading your blog
  18. You blog makes me blush, repeatedly
  19. I don’t want to know if my mom is reading your blog!
  20. Teenage boys hide your blog under their bed
  21. I sound like Kathleen Turner after reading your blog
  22. Your blog dates a Baldwin (unless it’s Steve)
  23. Your blog is on a book cover with Fabio
  24. Chris Isaak serenades your blog
  25. Your blog has its own lingerie line

Hypocrisy & Sex in Advertising, more from Blogworld

Hypocrisy riddles advertising when it comes to sex. Some interesting dichotomies were discussed at Blogworld Expo 2010 such as the portrayal of acceptable sex in the media. The delineating line in advertising being romantic sex is ok to use for sales but sex for the sake of sex is not. For example, KY Jelly ads always portrays married couples having sex. The message being, recreational sex is OK if you are married.

Of course this is not a new message or a new issue.  In the United States married sex is truly the only kind of sex that is OK to promote, whether it be recreational or procreational.  Sex between unmarried people for pure pleasure is frowned upon, at least in advertising.

Now outright sex might be frowned upon but implied sex, ie. provocative imagery, is not.  At least it is not frowned on for everyone.

The ability to utilize provocative imagery in advertising is inherently tied to the purveyor of the imagery. The brand is the ambassador not their image. So if the brand is respectable then sexually provocative imagery will be accepted, but if the brand is not considered mainstream acceptable then even conservatively provocative imagery will be viewed as innappropriate. This of course is a generalization. We do see backlash when even respectable brands push the envelope too far.  But they can still push the envelope much farther than so-called not respectable brands.

black and white image of a woman wearing only jeans laying on her back ontop of a man wearing only jeans. He is covering her breasts with his hands picture of a highway billboard for Adultcon

The image to the left is a Calvin Klein ad that is featured in mainstream magazines. Similar ads are on billboards in major cities, off highways and scattered across the country. The image to the left is a billboard for Adultcon, an adult entertainment convention. The Adultcon billboard was asked to be taken down because of its proximity to a school despite there being nothing provocative about the billboard. The only questionable thing it says is “Adult” and that word is not that questionable, though many would consider the inferred industry to be questionable.

Interestingly though, if you search “Porn Billboard Ad” in Google images, the first image you see is not some big breasted heaving porn star.  Nope Jenna Jameson was the third image! An ad by Calvin Klein
is the first.

Social Media & Sex: Adult Entertainment at Blogworld

Pete Housley, Kelly Shibari, Nina Hartley and Jamye Waxman at BlogworldIt is safe to say that adult entertainment is under represented in social media.  However, that is better than not represented.  At Blogworld Expo 2010 among all the wonderful and informative panels on social media, blogging, public speaking, brand building and PR was an adult entertainment gem tucked away.

The seminar was NSFW: Exploring Porn and Social Media, with speakers Adria Richards, Jamye Waxman, Kelly Shibari, Nina Hartley and Pete Housley. Though most of you probably know, this panel made up a power house of social media in adult entertainment.

This should come as no surprise, but many traditional SM strategies were discussed as being the same in adult entertainment as they are in mainstream media.

  • Make sure you have a point of view you are always promoting, this helps establish a voice.
  • 80% conversation and 20% call to action
  • It is all about engagement

Adult entertainers are more discriminated against in social media than other public figures.  Pete Housley told a story of an adult star whose name was taken by someone else on Twitter.  The person who claimed the name was squatting with it and refused to give it up. The star had to assume a different twitter handle. Of course this means that the benefit of her brand recognition for her name is received by someone else.  She also tried to get her account verified by Twitter, so that her non-branded twitter handle would be acknowledged as the real adult star.  But because she is an adult star, Twitter did not address her issue.

Though Twitter does not specifically prevent adult entertainment from networking on their service, they won’t really go out of their way to help anyone out either.

What this means is that adult entertainers have to work harder and smarter to maneuver the social media sphere. Of course, if you have to think about and plan out a social media strategy then it is far more likely to be successful then they people who just wing it.

So maybe the inherent disadvantage will prove to be a marketing advantage in the long run? What do you think?

Sex.com: Why you need a good domain name in adult entertainment

Sex dot com

whitehouse.com

Nasa.com

yahhoo.com

These are just a few of the web address that people go to and accidentally end up on a porn site.  The owners of these sites were no dummies. They knew what they were doing.  If you wanted to go to the White House, aka. where our president lives, you need to go to whitehouse.gov. If you wanted to see the National Aeronautics and Space Administration web site you need to go to Nasa.gov.  And if you want to go to the search engine, you need to go to yahoo.com. If you did not realize that whitehouse and Nasa were both .gov and not .com, or you mistyped yahoo, then you ended up on a porn site. Such simple mistakes that took you to wildly different content than was originally intended.

Though many people did not want to end up on those sites, there were many who were not upset by the surprise detour.  Whitehouse.com was pulling in over a million dollars a year before he sold it in 2009.  Who was the most interested buyer?  The government of course.

I point these out because your web address is important.  Sites like godaddy.com have made domain (web address) buying a cheap and simple process.  Now when people buy a web address, if they do not want someone else buying its nearest neighbor, they will buy the .com, .net, .org, .cc etc. addresses.

Finding a good web address that is easy to remember, or like yahhoo.com, an easy site to trip over, is important.  You want people to remember your web address.  People are reluctant to bookmark adult entertainment sites, especially if they have kids who access their computers.  So if you have sexywoman.com you are much easier to remember than, XXXwildboysexytoytimefuntub.com. Though now I am tempted to buy that domain because it is making me laugh.  But you get my point.  You want a domain that is to the point and easy to remember.  Keep clever banter, or witty puns to your site content. But if your site is videos of sexy blonds, then sexyblonds.com would be a good domain name.

Drive traffic by making it easy for people to find you and be memorable.

Team